Employment Law

Rowe Bristol Lawyers has extensive experience in advising on employment related legal issues, both from the perspective of the employer and the employee.

In Western Australia there are two different systems of employment law, being those laws created by the State Government of Western Australia (“the State System”) which is governed by the Industrial Relations Act 1979 and those laws created by the Federal Government (“the National System”) which is governed by the Fair Work Act 2009.

Whether an employer is a State System employer or National System Employer will be determined by the legal nature of the employer. If an employer is an incorporated entity that engages in significant or substantial trading (or financial) activities, then generally that entity will fall under the National System. However, if an employer is a sole trader, partnership, or an unincorporated association, then the employer will fall under the State System.

If an employer is an incorporated not-for-profit organisation, then whether or not an employer is a National System employer is less clear and it will depend on the level of financial or trading activity that the employer engages in and whether this forms a significant or substantial part of the employer’s overall activities.

At Rowe Bristol Lawyers, we pride ourselves on providing efficient cost effective legal advice and are proficient in providing advice in all areas of employment law.

If you require legal advice in relation to employment law, please do not hesitate to contact us to arrange a meeting so that we may consider your specific circumstances.

The above information is provided as general information only and should not be relied upon as legal advice. The accuracy of this information may have changed from the date when it was published.

Bullying and Workplace Harassment advice

At Rowe Bristol Lawyers, we understand the importance of maintaining a healthy productive workplace in achieving commercial outcomes. We consider that part of maintaining a healthy productive workplace is understanding and dealing with any instances of bullying and harassment with practical and astute legal advice.

Since 1 January 2014, National System Employees who reasonably believe they have been bullied at work can apply to the Fair Work Commission for an order to stop the bullying. This application is known as a Form F72 – Application for an order to stop the bullying.

Rowe Bristol Lawyers has extensive experience in assisting employers and employees with resolving bullying disputes both by assisting them in the preparation ofand response to a Form F72 – Application for an order to stop bullying and other legal claims of this nature.

Rowe Bristol Lawyers is also capable of assisting employers and employees in dealing with bullying and harassment issues internally through workplace investigations. We also can assist employers with preparing and developing internal grievance handling procedures so as to limit the likelihood of such issues arising and to more efficiently manage such issues as and when they occur.

If you require legal advice in relation to bullying and harassment, please do not hesitate to contact us to arrange a meeting so that we may consider your specific circumstances.

The above information is provided as general information only and should not be relied upon as legal advice. The accuracy of this information may have changed from the date when it was published.

Employment Contracts, agreements and policies

The employment contract is the legal agreement between an employer and an employee and its terms and conditions can be formulated in writing, verbally or by conduct. An employment contract should contain the terms and conditions that an employee and an employer have agreed will govern that employment relationship. For example, a person’s salary, leave entitlements and role will ordinarily be included in the contract.

Employment contracts, agreements and policies are an essential part of the management and governance of the employer/employee relationships. At Rowe Bristol Lawyers, we consider that the proper preparation of employment policies, contracts and agreements as not only integral for the efficient day to day running of any business but also as an essential first step in the prevention and mitigation of risk associated with unwanted legal claims and issues, as well as the better management of those legal claims and issues when, and if, they occur.

Rowe Bristol Lawyers has the experience and expertise to draft and review a broad spectrum of employment contracts and advise employees on their rights, entitlements and obligations under an employment contract or award. We can also assist employers with the refinement of their existing employment contracts and with the proper preparation of new employment contracts, agreements and internal policies so as to assist employers in more efficiently managing their employees.

If you require legal advice in relation to employment contracts, agreements and policies, please do not hesitate to contact us to arrange a meeting so that we may consider your specific circumstances.

The above information is provided as general information only and should not be relied upon as legal advice. The accuracy of this information may have changed from the date when it was published.

Equal opportunity obligations and Discrimination

There is no statutory or constitutional bill of rights in Australia. There is however a well-established principle of statutory interpretation in Australian courts where Parliament is presumed not to have intended to limit fundamental rights without a clear intention to do so. This principle is supported by the High Court decision of Coco v The Queen (1994) 179 CLR 427 at 437.

Despite this common law protection of individual rights, successive Australian Governments have also passed numerous acts of parliament aimed at promoting equal opportunity and protecting the individual from discrimination. In the Federal jurisdiction, these statues include the following:

  • Australian Human Rights Commission Act 1986(Cth)
  • Age Discrimination Act 2004 (Cth)
  • Disability Discrimination Act 1992 (Cth)
  • Racial Discrimination Act 1975 (Cth)
  • Sex Discrimination Act 1984 (Cth)

In the State jurisdiction, the Equal Opportunity Act1984(WA) was enacted by the Western Australian Parliament. It was enacted to promote equal opportunity and protection against discrimination on the grounds of sex, marital status, pregnancy, family responsibility or family status, race, religious or political conviction, impairment, age or, in certain cases, gender history in the areas of work, accommodation, education, the provision of goods, facilities and services, and the activities of clubs.

Rowe Bristol Lawyers has extensive experience in assisting employees and employers with claims made under the Equal Opportunity Act 1984 (WA)and in advising employers and employees of their equal opportunity obligations both at a common law and legislative level.

If you require legal advice in relation to equal opportunity and anti-discrimination obligations, please do not hesitate to contact us to arrange a meeting so that we may consider your specific circumstances.

The above information is provided as general information only and should not be relied upon as legal advice. The accuracy of this information may have changed from the date when it was published.

Constructive Dismissal

Constructive dismissal occurs in circumstances where an employee resigns his or her employment as a result of the employer’s conduct. This may be in circumstances where the employer has behaved in such a way that it left the employee with no other choice but to resign, or the employer requested and received the resignation of the employee. The issue is whether the employer’s conduct was such that it entitled the employee to treat the employment as at an end. This can also occur if the employee was demanded to an extent that would constitute dismissal from his or her previous role.

In constructive dismissal proceedings, the burden of proof is on the employee to establish that the employer’s conduct forced the employee to resign. (Australian Hearing v Peary [2009] AIRCFB 680). It is necessary to show that the conduct of ‘the employer (resulted) directly or consequentially in the termination of employment and the employment relationship (was) not voluntarily left by the employee’(Mohazbad v Dick Smith Electronics [1995] IRCA 272).

Constructive dismissal can be difficult to identify and establish and each claim for constructive dismissal may consist of vastly differing facts. It is important to understand that not every employee who leaves his or her employment as a result of the alleged conduct of the employer will be able to successfully claim they were constructively dismissed.

Rowe Bristol Lawyers have experience in analysing and identifying the circumstances which may lead to a claim for constructive dismissal and are able to advise and assist both employers and employees as to their rights and obligations with respective to such constructive dismissal claims.

If you require legal advice in relation to constructive dismissal, please do not hesitate to contact us to arrange a meeting so that we may consider your specific circumstances.

The above information is provided as general information only and should not be relied upon as legal advice. The accuracy of this information may have changed from the date when it was published.

Consultancy Agreements

Properly considered and drafted consultancy agreements and/or independent contracts for services have the potential to enable businesses to both deliver and receive services more efficiently and commercially without the necessary expense and capital required if those services were to be provided internally.

However, often potential risks for businesses in dealing with outside contractors, including the risk associated with the sharing of intellectual property and other confidential information including client lists, business expertise and strategy and more. At Rowe Bristol Lawyers, we are experienced at identifying such matters that need to be protected and drafting appropriate consultancy agreements that address the legitimate concerns of the parties.

It is important that the exact details, obligations and requirements of any consultancy agreement are clearly understood. Rowe Bristol Lawyers can assist businesses in understanding existing agreements and to prepare and negotiate new and effective consultancy agreements that are commercially astute and take into consideration the relevant requirements and obligation of the parties to the agreement.

If you require legal advice in relation to consultant agreements, please do not hesitate to contact us to arrange a meeting so that we may consider your specific circumstances.

The above information is provided as general information only and should not be relied upon as legal advice. The accuracy of this information may have changed from the date when it was published.

General protections claims

“Part 3- 01 - General Protections” of the Fair Work Act 2009 (Cth) (“Act”) contains provisions related to protecting workplace General Protection Rights the breach of which lend to what are called “General Protection Claims”. In summary, these provisions aim to ensure that a personnot treated adversely because he or she insisted on his or her workplace rights.

Section 340 of the Act states that:

(1) A person must not take adverse action against another person:

(a) because the other person:

(i) has a workplace right;
(ii) has, or has not, exercised a workplace right; or
(iii) proposes or proposes not to, or has at any time proposed or proposed not to exercise a workplace right, or

(b) to prevent the exercise of a workplace right by the other person.

(2) A person must not take adverse action against another person (the second person) because a third person has exercised, or proposes or has at any time proposed to exercise, a workplace right for the second person's benefit, or for the benefit of a class of persons to which the second person belongs.

An example of adverse action is when an employer dismisses, or discriminates or alters the position of an employee in a negative manner.If a person takesan adverse action as set out in section 340 of the Act against another personthat results in the termination of an employee’s employment, that employee can make a Form 8 -General Protections Application Involving Dismissal to the Fair Work Commission pursuant to section 365 of the Act.

If the matter is not resolved within the jurisdiction of the Fair Work Commission, the Fair Work Commission will issue a certificate to that effect. The employer will then have 14 days in which to file a General Protections court application, or if the parties consent, the employee can apply for the Fair Work Commission to conduct an arbitration to determine the matter, subject to any appeal.

A unique element of General Protection claims is that pursuant to section 361 of the Act:

(1) If:

(a) in an application in relation to a contravention of this Part, it is alleged that a person took, or is taking, action for a particular reason or with a particular intent; and

(b) taking that action for that reason or with that intent would constitute a contravention of this Part;

it is presumed, in proceedings arising from the application, that the action was, or is being, taken for that reason or with that intent, unless the person proves otherwise.

(2) Subsection (1) does not apply in relation to orders for an interim injunction.

As a result of section 361of the Act, the Fair Work Commission presumes that the employer which has taken the alleged action or adverse action has done so for the alleged reason or with the alleged intent unless the employer can prove otherwise. The presumption is a rebuttable one, which will require the employer seeking to rebut it to provide evidence as to the reason for taking the adverse action. In deciding whether or not the presumption will have been successfully rebutted the court will consider the particular reason for taking the action in the context of all the facts and circumstances at the time the decision was made.

The fact that once the allegation has been made the onus of proof shifts to the employerto prove that its actions were not taken for the reason or intent alleged has the effect of putting the employer on the back foot from an early stage in General Protection proceedings. Further, unlike an unfair dismissal application made in the Fair Work Commission, there is no legislative cap on the amount of damages an employee can claim and the application is open to all employees regardless of their annual income, which has the effect of exposing the employer to a large degree of uncertainty in respect of General Procedure claims.

Rowe Bristol Lawyers is skilled in:

  • advising employers and employees of their rights in respect of the General Protection provision of the Act;
  • preparing and filing General Protections claims on behalf of an employee and act on behalf of an employee in legal proceedings commenced in accordance with the General Protections provision of the Act;
  • advising employers in respect of General Protection claims made against them;
  • preparingand filing a response to a General Protections claim and representing an employer during those proceedings; and
  • appearing on behalf of an employee or employer at a Court or tribunal hearing that may be held.

If you require legal advice in relation to general protection claims, please do not hesitate to contact us to arrange a meeting so that we may consider your specific circumstances.

The above information is provided as general information only and should not be relied upon as legal advice. The accuracy of this information may have changed from the date when it was published.

Independent Contractor agreements

Businesses will often enter into agreements with independent contractors who may perform the duties of an employee but are not considered to be employees at law.It is important for employers and independent contractors to understand the nature of this relationship as it has important legal ramifications. This is because employers have certain obligations with respect to employees that are absent in an employer/independent contractor relationship.

For example, it is commonly the case that independent contractors are not covered by awards, do not receive paid superannuation benefits, are not entitled to annual or long service leave entitlements, superannuation or protection from unfair dismissal. The employer is not required to deduct tax from payments to an independent contractor. The employer also does not generally stand as liable for the actions of an independent contractor as it would with an employee, which has important insurance ramifications.This situation has in the past resulted in employers misrepresenting an employment relationship as an independent contractor arrangement. These circumstances sometimes induce employers to attempt to disguise an employment relationship as an independent contractor arrangement, which is known as a sham contracting arrangement.

Chapter 3, Division 6 of the Fair Work Act 2009(“Act”) establishes that employers must not:

  • knowingly or recklessly misrepresent to an employee or future employee that the employment relationship is actually an independent contract for services.
  • dismiss or threaten to dismiss an employee in order to engage them as an independent contractor to perform the same work, or substantially the same work under a new contract for services.  
  • knowingly make a false statement to an employee to persuade or influence the employee to enter into a contract for services to perform the same work, or substantially the same work.

Determining whether or not a person is an independent contractor or an employee is conducted through the application of the common law ‘control test’. In essence, the more control the employer has over the individual the more likely that the individual is an employee.

Sham contracting arrangements place employees at risk of losing employee entitlements and employers at risk of financial penalties under the Act and liable for compensation claims from employees as to lost entitlements.

Rowe Bristol Lawyers is experienced in providing advice in relation to independent contracting arrangements, including:

  • identifying the legal nature of the relationship that exists between the parties and advise clients accordingly;
  • advising clients as to the potential consequences of the existing relationship between the parties;
  • drafting commercial arrangements and independent contract agreements that protect employers and satisfy the employer’s obligation not to enter intosham contracting arrangements;
  • assisting employees with a claim for lost entitlements as a result of sham contracting arrangements; and
  • assisting employers to defend against a sham contracting claim. 

If you require legal advice in relation to independent contractor agreements, please do not hesitate to contact us to arrange a meeting so that we may consider your specific circumstances.

The above information is provided as general information only and should not be relied upon as legal advice. The accuracy of this information may have changed from the date when it was published.

Occupational Health and Safety

In Western Australia, workplace health and safety is regulated by the Occupational Safety and Health Act 1984 (WA) (“OSH Act”) and the Occupation Safety and Health Regulations 1996 (WA) (“OSH Regulations”).

The OSH Act establishes the Commission for Occupation Safety and Health (“Commission”), which is a tribunal that has been established to determine claims made under the OSH Act.

Amongst other things, the OSH Act:

  • imposes duties on a wide range is persons and entities and classes of persons and entities in workplace environments to, as far as reasonably practicable ensure that the work performed by the duty holder or persons working under the duty holder is not exposing that person or others to a health and safety risk;
  • establishes rights, including the right to cease or refuse to carry out work if the person has a reasonable concern that the work poses an imminent, serious risk to health and safety; and
  • establishes regulatory requirements such as licences, an incident notification framework, training certificates and other requirements. 

Breaches of the OSH Act can have far reaching and commercially adverse consequences for individuals and businesses, including prosecutions by Worksafe, fines and dismissal of employment.

Rowe Bristol Lawyers is able to advise and assist clients in complying with the OSH Act and the OSH Regulations address breaches or defend against alleged breaches of the OSH Act.

If you require legal advice in relation to occupational health and safety, please do not hesitate to contact us to arrange a meeting so that we may consider your specific circumstances.

The above information is provided as general information only and should not be relied upon as legal advice. The accuracy of this information may have changed from the date when it was published.

Redundancies

Redundancy occurs when an employer no longer requires the duties of a current position to be filled by anyone or the employer becomes insolvent or bankrupt. However, it is important to note that even if an employee’s previous duties are still being performed, redundancy can still occur by way of a company restructure or reorganisation due to a merger.

Different redundancy provision may apply in a particular circumstance depending on the industry, position with the employer, applicable award, whether an award or collective or individual agreement applies, and whether or not the employer is National System or State System employer.

That being said National System Employers (those governed by the Fair Work Act2009 (Cth) (“Act”)are required to adhere to the National Employment Standards, which set out the minimum entitlements for employees in respect of redundancy entitlements. In accordance with the National Employment Standards, an employee must be employed for a minimum of 12 months of continuous service by an employer (who is not a small business as defined by the Act) to receive any redundancy entitlements. The redundancy package applicable will be dependent on the age of the redundant employee and the number of years of continuous service.

Rowe Bristol Lawyers has extensive experience in redundancy matters and employment law matters in general, and is able to:

  • advise employers with respect to their redundancy entitlements obligations to employees;
  • advise employees of their redundancy entitlements;
  • advise employees on whether or not their redundancy is valid under the Act;
  • advise and assist employees on a claim for unpaid redundancy entitlements;
  • consider and advise clients on the effects of any modern award or collective bargaining agreements; and
  • advise clients of their redundancy obligations and/or entitlements in circumstances where there is a transfer of business.

If you require legal advice in relation to redundancies, please do not hesitate to contact us to arrange a meeting so that we may consider your specific circumstances.

The above information is provided as general information only and should not be relied upon as legal advice. The accuracy of this information may have changed from the date when it was published.

Restraints of Trade

Restraints of trade clauses aim to restrict a particular person from competing with another entity such as a previous or current employer, or business that the person has sold or exited.

In the case of employment contracts, restraint of trade clauses can operate to restrict a person’s conduct whilst they are still employed as well as when the employment relationship ceases.

For example, such a clause may require that a person not work in a personal capacity outside of his or her employment. Most commonly, these clauses are used to provide comfort that a senior employee will not be able to “poach” the employer’s work or clients.

Restraint of trade clauses are incorporated into employment contracts in an endeavour to protect an employer’s business interests including an employer’s trade secrets, confidential information, client lists and other intellectual property. However, restraint of trade clauses will only be enforceable in circumstances where the clause is reasonably necessary to protect the legitimate business interests of an employer and is not merely in place to protect an employer from competition.

Restraint of trade clause operate in conjunction with a number of common law restraints, which operate to regulate an employee’s conduct, including the implied duty of fidelity and good faith, and the equitable duty of confidence.

There are a number of types of restraint clauses that are designed to regulate an employee’s behaviour, both during an employment relationship and afterwards, including:

  • non-competition clauses;
  • non-solicitation/anti-poaching clauses (designed to prevent former employees enticing existing clients from an employer); and
  • confidentiality clauses (designed to protect trade secrets or other confidential information).

Notwithstanding the type of restraint, injunctive relief is a common remedy sought by employers endeavouring to restrain employees from a particular course of conduct. However, employers need to be aware that courts will interpret these clauses strictly and strike them (or portions of them) out if deemed to be unnecessarily onerous.

Rowe Bristol Lawyers is experienced in providing advice in relation to restraint clauses, including to:

  • provide advice on the legitimacy of restraint of trade clauses in employment contracts and other agreements;
  • draft restraint of trade clauses in employment contracts; and
  • commence and act for clients in legal proceedings related to the enforcement or defence of a restraint of trade clause.

If you require legal advice in relation to restraints of trade, please do not hesitate to contact us to arrange a meeting so that we may consider your specific circumstances.

The above information is provided as general information only and should not be relied upon as legal advice. The accuracy of this information may have changed from the date when it was published.

Sexual harassment

Regrettably, sexual harassment is a significant problem in some Australian workplaces. The Sex Discrimination Act 1984 (Cth) recognises sexual harassment as a form of sex discrimination. The law also recognises that sexual harassment can occur as a one off incident or be part of repeated or continuous conduct. Therefore, there is no requirement for it to constitute a pattern of conduct.

In Western Australia, in accordance with sections 24, 25 and 26of the Equal Opportunity Act 1984, sexual harassment is unlawful in the areas employment, education and accommodation respectively.

Complaints of sexual harassment under the Equal Opportunity Act 1984(WA) may first be lodged with the Commissioner for Equal Opportunity (“Commissioner”).The Commissioner may resolve the dispute through conciliation, fail to resolve the dispute through conciliation or dismiss the claim. The Commissioner has authority to refer the dispute to the State Administrative Tribunal (“SAT”) if the parties fail to successfully resolve the dispute through conciliation. If the Commissioner dismisses the claim, the complainant may request that the Commissioner refer the dispute to the SAT, which the Commissioner is required to do under section 90 of the Equal Opportunity Act 1984 (WA).

Once the matter is before the SAT, the SAT may make a number of different orders to address the unwanted conduct, including an award for damages not exceeding $40,000.00.

Additionally, sexual harassment is also unlawful in the area of employment under the Sex Discrimination Act1984 (Cth).

Rowe Bristol Lawyers has extensive experience in:

  • advising clients on matters pertaining to sexual harassment in the workplace;
  • assisting clients in developing policies against sexual harassment to protect employees from potential sexual harassment;
  • assisting clients in defending claims of sexual harassment in the workplace; and
  • assisting clients in instituting and progressing a claim of sexual harassment in the workplace.

If you require legal advice in relation to sexual harassment, please do not hesitate to contact us to arrange a meeting so that we may consider your specific circumstances.

The above information is provided as general information only and should not be relied upon as legal advice. The accuracy of this information may have changed from the date when it was published.

Unlawful Termination of Employment

The termination of an employment relationship can be difficult for both the employer and the employee, as often there is some uncertainty as to the legal rights of the parties and the consequences of bringing an employment relationship to an end.

Terminating an employee for unlawful reasons can have adverse commercial consequences for an employer and an employee. Section 772 (1) of the Fair Work Act 2009 (Cth) (“Act”) prohibits an employee to base a termination decision on a number of reasons including:

(a) temporary absence from work because of illness or injury of a kind prescribed by the regulations;

(b) trade union membership or participation in trade union activities outside of working hours or, with the employer's consent, during working hours;

(c) non‑membership of a trade union;

(d) seeking office as, or acting or having acted in the capacity of, a representative of employees such as a trade union official;

(e) making a complaint or participation in proceedings against an employer involving alleged violation of laws or regulations or recourse to competent administrative authorities;

(f) race, colour, gender, sexual preference, age, physical or mental disability, marital status, family or carer's responsibilities, pregnancy, religion, political opinion, national extraction or social origin;

(g) absence from work during maternity leave or other parental leave; and

(h) temporary absence from work for the purpose of engaging in a voluntary emergency management activity, where the absence is reasonable having regard to all the circumstances.

All State System employees or non-National System employeeswho have been dismissed for one of the above reasons may make an application for unlawful termination, as long as they have not made an alternative claim in relation to that termination.

Rowe Bristol Lawyers has significant experience in respect of unlawful termination disputes and employment law, in general, including:

  • advising clients on the validity of a termination of employment;
  • advising clients in relation to the possibility and likelihood of success in respect of a claim for unlawful termination;
  • assisting clients in responding to and/or defending against a claim for unlawful termination;
  • assisting and acting for clients in respect of making a claim for unlawful termination; and
  • assisting clients with making a claim for unpaid wages to the termination of employment.

If you require legal advice in relation to termination of employment, please do not hesitate to contact us to arrange a meeting so that we may consider your specific circumstances.

The above information is provided as general information only and should not be relied upon as legal advice. The accuracy of this information may have changed from the date when it was published.

Unfair/Unlawful dismissal claims

State System

For State System employers and employees who fall under the Industrial Relations Act 1979 (WA), unfair dismissal refers to a dismissal that is harsh, oppressive or unfair.

A claim for unfair dismissal under the State System must be made to the Western Australian Industrial Relations Commission within 28 days after the day on which the employee’s employment was terminated, unless the applicant can demonstrate circumstances that justify the acceptance of an application out of time in accordance with section 29(3) of the Industrial Relations Act 1979 (WA).

A non-National System employee who reasonably believes that his or her dismissal was harsh, oppressive or unfair can make an application for unfair dismissal, provided that the person’s income does not exceed the “prescribed amount” if the employee is not covered by an award or industrial agreement (see section 29AA (3) if the Industrial Relations Act 1979). Currently, the “prescribed amount” is $155,800 as at 1 July 2016.

National System

For National System employers and employees who fall under the jurisdiction of the Fair Work Act2009 (Cth), unfair dismissal refers to a termination that is harsh, unjust or unreasonable.

A claim for unfair dismissal by a National System employee must be made to the Fair Work Commission within 21 days of the dismissal taking effect, unless there is some reason(s) why it would be unfair for the Fair Work Commission not to accept the application.

In order to make an unfair dismissal application under the National System, an employee must:

  • be employed by a National System employer;
  • earn less than the high income threshold or be covered by a modern award or enterprise agreement;
  • have completed the “minimum period of employment” of 12 months or 6 months if you are employed by a “small business” as defined by the Fair Work Act 2009 (Cth);
  • not be a casual employee employed on an irregular basis;
  • not be an employee that is employed on a seasonal basis, or for a specific task or for a specific period of time; and
  • not be subject to a limited duration training agreement

Rowe Bristol Lawyers has extensive experience in unfair/unlawful dismissal claim matters including employment law matters in general including to:

  • advise employees on whether or not they have a valid claim for unfair dismissal in either the Western Australian Industrial Relations Commission or the Fair Work Commission;
  • represent employers in defending a claim for unfair dismissal at the Fair Work Commission or the Western Australian Industrial Relations Commission;
  • represent employees in making a claim for unfair dismissal in the Fair Work Commission or the Western Australian Industrial Relations Commission;
  • appear for employers and employees at any mediation, final hearing or conciliation conference at the Fair Work Commission or Western Australian Industrial Relations Commission;
  • assist clients in negotiating a settlement arrangement;
  • advise employers on how to effectively manage the termination of an employment relationship.

If you require legal advice in relation to unfair/unlawful dismissal claims, please do not hesitate to contact us to arrange a meeting so that we may consider your specific circumstances.

The above information is provided as general information only and should not be relied upon as legal advice. The accuracy of this information may have changed from the date when it was published.